Course1

"Boilplate" Provisions in Contracts: Overlooked Traps in Every Agreement

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Shannon M. Bell

The “back of the book” provisions of common business, commercial and real estate agreements are often labeled “boilerplate,” copied and pasted from earlier agreements. But when disputes arise, these overlooked provisions – related to damages, choice of law and forum, notice, integration, and amendments – can determine the fate transaction. These provisions, if not closely examined in the context of every agreement, can provide grounds for litigation – or threats of litigation. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting essential “boilerplate” provisions with an emphasis on reducing risk.   Damages – types, limitations, drafting traps Choice of law/choice of forum – what the law allows v. what parties prefer Amendments – forms of written amendments, email, and course of dealing Notice – adapting methods to digital communication, traps Integration – conversations, extraneous writings, and assumptions Speaker: Shannon M. Bell is a member with Kelly Law Partners, LLC, where she litigates a wide variety of complex business disputes, construction disputes, fiduciary claims, employment issues, and landlord/tenant issues.  Her construction experience extends from contract negotiations to defense of construction claims of owners, HOAs, contractors and tradesmen.  She also represents clients in claims of shareholder and officer liability, piercing the corporate veil, and derivative actions.  She writes and speaks on commercial litigation, employment, discovery and bankruptcy topics.  Ms. Bell earned her B.S. from the University of Iowa and her J.D. from the University of Denver.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.     

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 4/20/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

"Founding Documents": Drafting Articles of Incorporation & Bylaws, Part 1

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Eric J. Zinn

  Though LLCs have become a default choice of entity for many businesses, corporations – C Corps and S Corps – still produce optimal results for many family-held businesses or businesses operating in industries where the corporate is preferred or required.  The founding documents of corporations – Articles of Incorporation, Stockholders’ Agreements, and bylaws – are complex, interlocking instruments that create and regulate the capital structure, governance, and finance of the business.  Very important issues of who can own stock, how that stock is valued and transferred, how major corporate decisions are made, and how disputes are resolved are all determined by these documents. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning and drafting the essential founding documents of corporations.  Day 1: Practical planning and drafting founding documents Counseling clients about the allocation of voting power and distribution preferences Framework of law – what’s required, what can be modified, what’s discretionary Defining common stock characteristics – classes, voting rights Uses of preferred stock – classes, rights, preferences Tax issues to consider when drafting founding documents Day 2: Instituting boards of directors – duties, restrictions, indemnification Approval of shareholders – major transactions, voting thresholds, procedures Restrictions on the transferability of stock Major components of corporate bylaws Common traps in drafting founding documents – avoiding later litigation  Speaker:  Eric J. Zinn is of counsel in the Denver office of Kutak Rock, LLP.  He represents clients in clients in matters involving corporate, individual and partnership taxation, state and local taxation, and corporate mergers, acquisitions and finance. He is a frequent lecturer on topics including the proper choice of legal entity for the operation of a business enterprise, drafting operating agreements for limited liability companies, international taxation, partnership taxation, and like-kind exchanges.  He is an Adjunct Professor at the University of Colorado-Denver Business School and at the University of Colorado School of Law in Boulder. He is the author of "Colorado Limited Liability Company Forms and Practice Manual,” published by Data Trace Publishing. Before entering private practice he served as a judicial clerk to the U.S. Tax Court. Mr. Zinn earned his B.A. from the University of the South, J.D. and LL.M. in taxation from the University of Florida College of Law, and M.S. in finance, M.S. in information systems, and M.B.A. from the University of Colorado-Denver.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 10/6/23
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

"Founding Documents": Drafting Articles of Incorporation & Bylaws, Part 2

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Eric J. Zinn

  Though LLCs have become a default choice of entity for many businesses, corporations – C Corps and S Corps – still produce optimal results for many family-held businesses or businesses operating in industries where the corporate is preferred or required.  The founding documents of corporations – Articles of Incorporation, Stockholders’ Agreements, and bylaws – are complex, interlocking instruments that create and regulate the capital structure, governance, and finance of the business.  Very important issues of who can own stock, how that stock is valued and transferred, how major corporate decisions are made, and how disputes are resolved are all determined by these documents. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning and drafting the essential founding documents of corporations.  Day 1: Practical planning and drafting founding documents Counseling clients about the allocation of voting power and distribution preferences Framework of law – what’s required, what can be modified, what’s discretionary Defining common stock characteristics – classes, voting rights Uses of preferred stock – classes, rights, preferences Tax issues to consider when drafting founding documents Day 2: Instituting boards of directors – duties, restrictions, indemnification Approval of shareholders – major transactions, voting thresholds, procedures Restrictions on the transferability of stock Major components of corporate bylaws Common traps in drafting founding documents – avoiding later litigation  Speaker:  Eric J. Zinn is of counsel in the Denver office of Kutak Rock, LLP.  He represents clients in clients in matters involving corporate, individual and partnership taxation, state and local taxation, and corporate mergers, acquisitions and finance. He is a frequent lecturer on topics including the proper choice of legal entity for the operation of a business enterprise, drafting operating agreements for limited liability companies, international taxation, partnership taxation, and like-kind exchanges.  He is an Adjunct Professor at the University of Colorado-Denver Business School and at the University of Colorado School of Law in Boulder. He is the author of "Colorado Limited Liability Company Forms and Practice Manual,” published by Data Trace Publishing. Before entering private practice he served as a judicial clerk to the U.S. Tax Court. Mr. Zinn earned his B.A. from the University of the South, J.D. and LL.M. in taxation from the University of Florida College of Law, and M.S. in finance, M.S. in information systems, and M.B.A. from the University of Colorado-Denver.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 10/7/23
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Assuming Liabilities/Debt in Transactions: Tricks and Traps

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Steven O. Weise

This program will provide you a practical guide to drafting for the assumption and limitation of liabilities in business and commercial transactions.  The program will cover the mechanics of assuming debt in a transaction, how it is identified, terms negotiated and documented. The program will discuss the related issue of how “bad conduct” carve-outs in indemnification and other limitation of liability provisions can defeat limitations on liability if the carve-outs are not carefully drafted.  Successor liability in business transactions and techniques to mitigate its risk will be covered. This program will provide a real-world guide to handling debt and liabilities in transactions.   Identifying and documenting the assumption of liabilities Successor liability and techniques to mitigate the risk “Bad conduct” carve-outs in indemnification and limitation of liability Risks of carve-out language being over-expansive and defeating liability protection Mistakes in the treatment of liabilities in transactions   Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 8/25/23
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Baskets and Escrow in Business Transactions

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Steven O. Weise

Identifying and hedging the risk of the unknown is one of the biggest risks in business documentation.  If unknown liabilities arise – or known liabilities are greater than anticipated –parties want recourse to address the economic loss.  “Caps” and “baskets” are used to address this problem.  Caps are the the total amount for which one party may be liable to the other party post-closing. “Baskets” are the amount of loss one party must incur, if any, before seeking recourse to the other party. The variations and interplay between caps and baskets can be highly complex. This program will provide you with a practical guide to the uses, types, and drafting traps of caps and baskets in business transactions.   Types of “baskets” – “tipping baskets” v. “true deductibles” v. hybrids Negotiating “caps” – aggregates limits, specific carve-outs for fraud and other bad acts Intricate relationship between baskets and caps Drafting to reduce risk of dispute and enhance collectability of claims Use of escrow to ensure payment of indemnification claims   Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.     Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials. 

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 11/21/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Business & Corporate Law Section Meeting and CLE - 2021 Annual Meeting

$50.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Oklahoma Bar Association

Business & Corporate Law Section Meeting and CLE Filmed during the 2021 Annual Meeting “Net Working Capital Adjustments and Quality of Earnings Audits”Christopher Lee with Infinity Capital Partners, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials. 

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 11/8/23
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Business Divorce, Part 1

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Frank Ciatto, Norman Lencz

Business divorce can be as complicated, costly and dramatic as traditional divorce. When owners of a closely-held company decide they cannot or will not work together anymore, there are several alternatives for achieving the separation – a division of assets among the owners, a buyout of one owner or several owners by a third party or by the company itself, or a complete or partial sale of the company.  But these and other transactional forms come with risk – the risk that dividing the assets of an operating business will cause substantial destruction of value to the company or that strife will take its toll on operations and employees.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to the alternatives for achieving a business divorce, planning the process, containing the risk and preserving value. Day 1: Overview of techniques to accomplish a divorce – buy-sell arrangements, redemptions, compensation, employment separation and retirement plan techniques Special considerations when the divorce involves LLCs, S Corps or partnerships Valuation methods and disputes in a business divorce Techniques for financing a buyout as part of a business divorce Minimizing adverse tax consequences in a business divorce Day 2: Compensation and retirement plan-based techniques for accomplishing a business divorce Special issues when a business divorce involves a distressed business Role of confidentiality, non-competition, and non-solicitation agreements as part of the divorce Important intellectual property issues, including customer lists, goodwill and trade secrets Preservation of valuable tax attributes   Speakers: Frank Ciatto is a partner in the Washington D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he has 20 years' experience advising clients on mergers and acquisitions, limited liability cocmpanies, tax and accounting issues, and corporate finance transactions.  He is a leader of his firm's private equity and hedge fund groups and a member of the Mergers & Acquisitions Subcommittee of the ABA Business Law Section.  He is a Certified Public Accountant and earlier in his career worked at what is now PricewaterhouseCoopers in New York.  Mr. Ciatto earned his B.A., cum laude, at Georgetown University and his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. Norman Lencz is a partner in the Baltimore, Maryland office of Venable, LLP, where his practice focuses on a broad range of federal, state, local and international tax matters.  He advises clients on tax issues relating to corporations, partnerships, LLCs, joint ventures and real estate transactions.  He also has extensive experience with compensation planning in closely held businesses.  Mr. Lencz earned his B.S. from the University of Maryland and his J.D. from Columbia University School of Law.     Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials. 

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 11/8/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Business Divorce, Part 2

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Frank Ciatto, Norman Lencz

Business divorce can be as complicated, costly and dramatic as traditional divorce. When owners of a closely-held company decide they cannot or will not work together anymore, there are several alternatives for achieving the separation – a division of assets among the owners, a buyout of one owner or several owners by a third party or by the company itself, or a complete or partial sale of the company.  But these and other transactional forms come with risk – the risk that dividing the assets of an operating business will cause substantial destruction of value to the company or that strife will take its toll on operations and employees.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to the alternatives for achieving a business divorce, planning the process, containing the risk and preserving value. Day 1: Overview of techniques to accomplish a divorce – buy-sell arrangements, redemptions, compensation, employment separation and retirement plan techniques Special considerations when the divorce involves LLCs, S Corps or partnerships Valuation methods and disputes in a business divorce Techniques for financing a buyout as part of a business divorce Minimizing adverse tax consequences in a business divorce Day 2: Compensation and retirement plan-based techniques for accomplishing a business divorce Special issues when a business divorce involves a distressed business Role of confidentiality, non-competition, and non-solicitation agreements as part of the divorce Important intellectual property issues, including customer lists, goodwill and trade secrets Preservation of valuable tax attributes   Speakers: Frank Ciatto is a partner in the Washington D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he has 20 years' experience advising clients on mergers and acquisitions, limited liability cocmpanies, tax and accounting issues, and corporate finance transactions.  He is a leader of his firm's private equity and hedge fund groups and a member of the Mergers & Acquisitions Subcommittee of the ABA Business Law Section.  He is a Certified Public Accountant and earlier in his career worked at what is now PricewaterhouseCoopers in New York.  Mr. Ciatto earned his B.A., cum laude, at Georgetown University and his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. Norman Lencz is a partner in the Baltimore, Maryland office of Venable, LLP, where his practice focuses on a broad range of federal, state, local and international tax matters.  He advises clients on tax issues relating to corporations, partnerships, LLCs, joint ventures and real estate transactions.  He also has extensive experience with compensation planning in closely held businesses.  Mr. Lencz earned his B.S. from the University of Maryland and his J.D. from Columbia University School of Law.     Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials. 

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 11/9/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Business Torts: How Transactions Spawn Litigation, Part 1

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  William J. Kelly, III, Shannon M. Bell

Business and commercial transactions are fraught with potential tort liability for attorneys and their clients. Whether out of disappointment at losing a deal or as a negotiating tactic or legitimate belief, counter-parties, competitors and third parties can easily allege tortious interference with existing or prospective business relationships.  There is also the risk of breaching the duty of good faith and fair dealing in transactions or misusing proprietary information obtained in negotiations in a failed deal. This program will you with a practical framework for understanding the range of business torts and real-world defenses. Day 1: Intentional interference with an existing contractual relationship – and the “business privilege” of competitors Interference with a prospective contract or transaction – what’s an “expectancy”? Fraudulent misrepresentations – how does an attorney spot “intent”? Negligent misrepresentation, including contributory negligence and the economic loss rule   Day 2: Implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing – what it means for contract negotiations Contract terms involving discretion v. explicit terms Misdeeds by clients in contract negotiations Misappropriation of trade secrets disclosed in contract negotiations Usurpation of business opportunities and the organizational opportunity doctrine Torts in recruiting and hiring key employees away from competitors   Speakers: William J. Kelly, III is a founding member of Kelly & Walker LLC and has more than 25 years’ experience in the areas of employment and commercial litigation.  In the area of employment law, he litigates trade secret, non-compete, infringement and discrimination claims in federal and state courts nationwide and has advised Fortune 50 companies on workplace policies and practices.  In the area of commercial litigation, his experience includes class action litigation, breach of contract and indemnity, mass-claim complex insurance litigation, construction litigation and trade secrets.  Earlier in career, he founded 15 Minutes Music, an independent music production company.  Mr. Kelly earned his B.A. from Tulane University and his J.D. from St. Louis University School of Law. Shannon M. Bell is a member with Kelly & Walker, LLC, where she litigates a wide variety of complex business disputes, construction disputes, fiduciary claims, employment issues, and landlord/tenant issues.  Her construction experience extends from contract negotiations to defense of construction claims of owners, HOAs, contractors and tradesmen.  She also represents clients in claims of shareholder and officer liability, piercing the corporate veil, and derivative actions.  She writes and speaks on commercial litigation, employment, discovery and bankruptcy topics.  Ms. Bell earned her B.S. from the University of Iowa and her J.D. from the University of Denver.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 12/1/23
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Business Torts: How Transactions Spawn Litigation, Part 2

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  William J. Kelly, III, Shannon M. Bell

Business and commercial transactions are fraught with potential tort liability for attorneys and their clients. Whether out of disappointment at losing a deal or as a negotiating tactic or legitimate belief, counter-parties, competitors and third parties can easily allege tortious interference with existing or prospective business relationships.  There is also the risk of breaching the duty of good faith and fair dealing in transactions or misusing proprietary information obtained in negotiations in a failed deal. This program will you with a practical framework for understanding the range of business torts and real-world defenses. Day 1: Intentional interference with an existing contractual relationship – and the “business privilege” of competitors Interference with a prospective contract or transaction – what’s an “expectancy”? Fraudulent misrepresentations – how does an attorney spot “intent”? Negligent misrepresentation, including contributory negligence and the economic loss rule   Day 2: Implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing – what it means for contract negotiations Contract terms involving discretion v. explicit terms Misdeeds by clients in contract negotiations Misappropriation of trade secrets disclosed in contract negotiations Usurpation of business opportunities and the organizational opportunity doctrine Torts in recruiting and hiring key employees away from competitors   Speakers: William J. Kelly, III is a founding member of Kelly & Walker LLC and has more than 25 years’ experience in the areas of employment and commercial litigation.  In the area of employment law, he litigates trade secret, non-compete, infringement and discrimination claims in federal and state courts nationwide and has advised Fortune 50 companies on workplace policies and practices.  In the area of commercial litigation, his experience includes class action litigation, breach of contract and indemnity, mass-claim complex insurance litigation, construction litigation and trade secrets.  Earlier in career, he founded 15 Minutes Music, an independent music production company.  Mr. Kelly earned his B.A. from Tulane University and his J.D. from St. Louis University School of Law. Shannon M. Bell is a member with Kelly & Walker, LLC, where she litigates a wide variety of complex business disputes, construction disputes, fiduciary claims, employment issues, and landlord/tenant issues.  Her construction experience extends from contract negotiations to defense of construction claims of owners, HOAs, contractors and tradesmen.  She also represents clients in claims of shareholder and officer liability, piercing the corporate veil, and derivative actions.  She writes and speaks on commercial litigation, employment, discovery and bankruptcy topics.  Ms. Bell earned her B.S. from the University of Iowa and her J.D. from the University of Denver.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 12/2/23
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Charging Orders in Business Transactions

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Steven O. Weise, Daniel Kleinberger

A charging order redirects a partner or LLC member’s distributions, if any, to a creditor.  These court orders are frequently used when an LLC or partnership interest has been pledged to a creditor as collateral and the debtor is in default. Charging orders differ substantially from liens on corporate stock because charging orders do not allow the creditor to foreclose on the LLC or partnership interest but only claim distributions from the entity.  The creditor does not succeed to any other rights of the LLC member – voting rights, management rights – and is totally dependent on the entity to make distributions.  This program will provide you with a real-world guide to the uses and limitations of charging orders in transactions and tips on enhancing their effectiveness.    What does a creditor get with a charging order and what rights does the debtor retain? Impact of charging orders on the entity Enhancing the enforceability of charging orders Enforcement of one state’s charging order statute in another state Tax consequences of charging orders   Speakers: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law. Daniel Kleinberger is an Emeritus Professor of Law at Michell|Hamline where his teaching and scholarship focused on business law.  He has served as the reporter on many uniform laws in business law, including Series Unincorporated Entities and Limited Partnerships.  Before entering academic, he was an in-hose counsel at the 3m Corporation.  He is the author of a leading treatise on LLCs and a popular student treatise on agency, partnerships, and LLCs.  Professor Kleinberger earned his A.B. from Harvard University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 4/16/23
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Closely Held Company Merger & Acquisitions, Part 1

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Daniel G. Straga, Molly Merritts

Mergers and buyouts of closely held companies are complex, multifaceted processes.  Agreeing on a valuation can be very difficult because there is no regular market of buyers and sellers and information on comparable sales is scarce. Closely held companies are typically structured to benefit a few shareholders, often members of a family, and require their financial statements to be normalized. There can also be substantial issues of liability, including successor liability in asset deals, requiring carefully crafted reps and warranties. Confidentiality is often essential in these transactions as sellers try not to unsettle existing commercial relationships and employees. This program will provide you with a practical guide to major planning and drafting considerations in the mergers and buyouts of closely held companies.   Day 1: Confidentiality considerations in the sale and negotiation process Due diligence – financial, operational and workforce red flags Stock v. asset transactions and forms of consideration – cash v. equity Valuation of closely held companies in an illiquid market Use or of “earnouts” to bridge the gap in valuation   Day 2:  Reps, warranties, indemnity and basket issues common to closely held companies Successor liability concerns where assets are transferred Asset transfer issues – intangible assets, including intellectual property Transition issues – management, employees, business relationship, contract issues Escrow and post-closing issues   Speaker: Daniel G. Straga is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he counsels companies on a wide variety of corporate and business matters across a range of industries. He advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, capital raising, venture capital, and governance matters.  He also have extensive experience in private equity and cross-border transactions.  Mr. Straga earned his and his B.A. from the University of Delaware and his J.D. from the George Washington University Law School. Molly Merritts is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where she focuses her practice on a wide range of corporate law matters, including mergers and acquisitions, debt and equity financing, and real estate investment trusts. She also advises clients on corporate governance matters, transactional and commercial contract negotiations, and corporate reorganizations.  Ms. Merritt earned her B.S. from the University of Maryland, and her J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials. 

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 5/10/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Closely Held Company Merger & Acquisitions, Part 2

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Daniel G. Straga, Molly Merritts

Mergers and buyouts of closely held companies are complex, multifaceted processes.  Agreeing on a valuation can be very difficult because there is no regular market of buyers and sellers and information on comparable sales is scarce. Closely held companies are typically structured to benefit a few shareholders, often members of a family, and require their financial statements to be normalized. There can also be substantial issues of liability, including successor liability in asset deals, requiring carefully crafted reps and warranties. Confidentiality is often essential in these transactions as sellers try not to unsettle existing commercial relationships and employees. This program will provide you with a practical guide to major planning and drafting considerations in the mergers and buyouts of closely held companies. Day 1: Confidentiality considerations in the sale and negotiation process Due diligence – financial, operational and workforce red flags Stock v. asset transactions and forms of consideration – cash v. equity Valuation of closely held companies in an illiquid market Use or of “earnouts” to bridge the gap in valuation Day 2:  Reps, warranties, indemnity and basket issues common to closely held companies Successor liability concerns where assets are transferred Asset transfer issues – intangible assets, including intellectual property Transition issues – management, employees, business relationship, contract issues Escrow and post-closing issues   Speaker: Daniel G. Straga is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he counsels companies on a wide variety of corporate and business matters across a range of industries. He advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, capital raising, venture capital, and governance matters.  He also have extensive experience in private equity and cross-border transactions.  Mr. Straga earned his and his B.A. from the University of Delaware and his J.D. from the George Washington University Law School. Molly Merritts is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where she focuses her practice on a wide range of corporate law matters, including mergers and acquisitions, debt and equity financing, and real estate investment trusts. She also advises clients on corporate governance matters, transactional and commercial contract negotiations, and corporate reorganizations.  Ms. Merritt earned her B.S. from the University of Maryland, and her J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials. 

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 5/11/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Closely Held Stock Options, Restricted Stock, Etc.

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  C. Ben Huber

Equity-based compensation is often essential to recruiting and retaining key employees in closely held companies.  Whether through the use of stock options, restricted stock, appreciation rights or other instruments and techniques, incentive compensation aligns the financial interests of key employees with the entity. Incentive compensation also often has the benefit of not requiring the immediately outlay of cash. Depending on the instruments used, equity-based compensation may also help defer tax recognition.  Compensation in LLCs takes on different forms but functions similarly. This program will provide you with a practical guide to equity-based incentive compensation in closely held companies.   C and S Corp incentive compensation v. pass-through entity incentive compensation Eligibility for tax-favored Incentive Stock Options v. non-qualified stock options Use of restricted stock – valuation, vesting, and treatment Appreciation rights in corporate and pass-through entities Common structuring and drafting traps Tax treatment, advantages and disadvantages of incentive compensation   Speaker: C. Ben Huber is a partner in the Denver office of Greenburg Traurig, LLP, where he has a broad transactional practice encompassing mergers and acquisitions, restructurings and reorganizations, corporate finance, capital markets, venture funds, commercial transactions and general corporate law.  He also has substantial experience as counsel to high tech, biotech and software companies in the development, protection and licensing of intellectual property.  His clients include start-up companies, family- and other closely-held businesses, middle market business, Fortune 500 companies, venture funds and institutional investors.  Mr. Huber earned his B.A. from the University of Colorado and his J.D. at the University of Colorado Law School.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 8/9/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Director and Officer Liability

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Frank Ciatto

Statutory and common law impose certain fiduciary duties—care, diligence, good faith, and fair dealing—on directors and managers of corporate entities, managers of LLCs, and in certain instances members of LLCs. The corporate and organizational opportunity doctrines also operate to restrict the activity of closely held company stakeholders, preventing misappropriation of certain corporate or LLC opportunities. In certain instances, the owners of the entity may want to expand, limit, or even entirely eliminate these duties. Depending on the entity involved and the specific duty, the law may allow modification by agreement, but unintended consequences may be substantial. This program provides you with a practical guide to fiduciary duties in corporations and LLCs, how they may be modified, and the possible consequences.   • Fiduciary duties in closely held corporations and LLCs• Corporate fiduciary duties and standards of review—duty of loyalty and duty of care• Conflicts of interest and self-dealing issues in closely held corporations• Fiduciary duties in LLCs—standards set by contract and by law• Which duties may be modified or eliminated—and which may not• How the corporate and organizational opportunity doctrines work in closely held companies.   Speaker: Frank Ciatto is a partner in the Washington, DC, office of Venable LLP, where he advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, limited liability companies, tax and accounting issues, and corporate finance transactions. He is a leader of his firm’s private equity and hedge fund groups and a member of the ABA Business Law Section Mergers & Acquisitions Subcommittee. He is also a Certified Public Accountant. James DePaoli is an attorney in the Washington, DC, office of Venable LLP, where his practice focuses on corporate and commercial matters. He represents clients in the acquisition and disposition of assets and securities, mergers, and other business combinations and reorganizations.     Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials. 

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 9/30/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Drafting Arbitration Agreements in Business and Commercial Transactions

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Shannon Bell

One of the biggest risks in most business, commercial, or real estate agreements is the risk of dispute and costly, protracted litigation. Arbitration agreements are one of the primary methods by which this substantial risk of loss is contained. Rather than the parties resorting to costly litigation, they are required to seek resolution of their dispute before a neutral arbiter, whose decision in the matter is final and cannot be litigated. Though these agreements are effective mechanisms for dispute resolution and cost containment, they are also highly controversial. This program will provide you with a practical guide the law governing arbitration agreements and drafting their major provisions.   Framework of law governing arbitration agreements Practical uses in business, commercial, and real estate transactions Circumstances where arbitration is effective v. ineffective Counseling clients about the benefits, risks, and tradeoffs of arbitration agreements Scope of arbitration, mandatory nature, and rules used Defining applicable law, arbiter selection, and method of arbitration Judgment on award, review by courts (if any), interim relief   Speaker: Shannon M. Bell is a member with Kelly & Walker, LLC, where she litigates a wide variety of complex business disputes, construction disputes, fiduciary claims, employment issues, and landlord/tenant issues.  Her construction experience extends from contract negotiations to defense of construction claims of owners, HOAs, contractors and tradesmen.  She also represents clients in claims of shareholder and officer liability, piercing the corporate veil, and derivative actions.  She writes and speaks on commercial litigation, employment, discovery and bankruptcy topics.  Ms. Bell earned her B.S. from the University of Iowa and her J.D. from the University of Denver.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 10/21/23
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Drafting Business Service Agreements

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Joel R. Buckberg

Companies are increasingly focused on their “core competencies,” outsourcing all other functions – sales, bookkeeping, IT, customer and product support, warranty work – to third party professionals and their companies.  Drafting agreements to capture this work is unlike drafting a conventional employment agreement.  It requires a sophisticated understanding of the service, benchmarks for performance and reporting, and the protection of confidential business information. The underlying agreement must comprehend how all of these elements operate together.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting services agreements in business.  Drafting services agreements for “hard” and “soft” services Scope of services provided, modification of services, and relationship to fees Performance standards and timeliness of delivery of services Types of fee structures and common traps Ensuring ownership of key files, records, “know how,” customer lists, and trade secrets Issues related to sub-contracting, designation of agents, and assignment of the contract Conflicts of interest, limitation of liability, and indemnification  Speaker:   Joel R. Buckberg is a partner in the Nashville office of Baker Donelson, LLP.  He more than 40 years’ experience in corporate and business transactions.  His practice focuses on corporate and asset transactions and operations, particularly in hospitality, franchising and distribution.  He also counsels clients on strategic planning, financing, mergers and acquisitions, system policy and practice development, regulatory compliance and contract system drafting. Prior to joining Baker Donelson, he was executive vice president and deputy general counsel of Cendant Corporation.  Mr. Buckberg received his B.S. form Union College, his M.B.A. from Vanderbilt University, and his J.D. from Vanderbilt University School of Law.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials. 

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 5/26/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Drafting Buy/Sell Agreements for Closely Held Companies, Part 1

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Daniel G. Straga

  There is rarely a liquid market for the sale or exchange of ownership interests in closely-held companies.  Buy/sell agreements fix that problem by creating a market among the owners of a company, providing a mechanism for owners to liquidate their interests in a reliable manner. The owners may agree to buy and sell interests among themselves on the occurrence of certain events and using certain valuation metrics, or they may agree that the company itself will redeem an owner’s interest. Without these agreements, there is often no alternative for an owner to cash out, short of liquidating the company. This program will provide you with a practical guide to the different types of buy/sell agreements, drafting the essential provisions of each, and common negotiating and drafting tips. Day 1: Types of buy/sell agreements – cross-purchase among owners, entity redemption, and hybrid approaches Most highly negotiated provisions of buy/sell agreements Triggering events – voluntary sale, retirement, death, bankruptcy of shareholder or member Valuation of interests – appraisals, formula clauses,comps, and dispute resolution Rights of first offer v. rights of first refusal, and sales to third parties Day 2: Funding buy/sell arrangements  – payouts/earnouts over time, commercial borrowing, key-man insurance, other funding sources Special issues involving S Corps and unincorporated entities Drag-along and tag-along rights in buy/sell agreements Major tax issues in buy/sell agreements for buyer, seller and the entity   Speaker: Daniel G. Straga is counsel in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he counsels companies on a wide variety of corporate and business matters across a range of industries. He advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, capital raising, venture capital, and governance matters.  He also have extensive experience in private equity and cross-border transactions.Mr. Straga earned his and his B.A. from the University of Delaware and his J.D. from the George Washington University Law School.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 6/23/23
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Drafting Buy/Sell Agreements for Closely Held Companies, Part 2

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Daniel G. Straga

There is rarely a liquid market for the sale or exchange of ownership interests in closely-held companies.  Buy/sell agreements fix that problem by creating a market among the owners of a company, providing a mechanism for owners to liquidate their interests in a reliable manner. The owners may agree to buy and sell interests among themselves on the occurrence of certain events and using certain valuation metrics, or they may agree that the company itself will redeem an owner’s interest. Without these agreements, there is often no alternative for an owner to cash out, short of liquidating the company. This program will provide you with a practical guide to the different types of buy/sell agreements, drafting the essential provisions of each, and common negotiating and drafting tips. Day 1: Types of buy/sell agreements – cross-purchase among owners, entity redemption, and hybrid approaches Most highly negotiated provisions of buy/sell agreements Triggering events – voluntary sale, retirement, death, bankruptcy of shareholder or member Valuation of interests – appraisals, formula clauses,comps, and dispute resolution Rights of first offer v. rights of first refusal, and sales to third parties Day 2: Funding buy/sell arrangements  – payouts/earnouts over time, commercial borrowing, key-man insurance, other funding sources Special issues involving S Corps and unincorporated entities Drag-along and tag-along rights in buy/sell agreements Major tax issues in buy/sell agreements for buyer, seller and the entity   Speaker: Daniel G. Straga is counsel in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he counsels companies on a wide variety of corporate and business matters across a range of industries. He advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, capital raising, venture capital, and governance matters.  He also have extensive experience in private equity and cross-border transactions.Mr. Straga earned his and his B.A. from the University of Delaware and his J.D. from the George Washington University Law School.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 6/24/23
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Drafting Escrow Agreements in Business & Commercial Transactions

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Steven O. Weise

Every escrow agreement has a degree of intrinsic uncertainty.  Whether the agreement is for the release of money, property title, software code, or something else, the escrow agent must determine whether certain conditions have been met before releasing the property held in escrow.  That involves a degree of judgement, and like all judgments, subject to dispute.  In this sense, escrow agreements, which are intended to limit risk and enhance the certainty of a transaction, introduce another layer of risk. This puts a priority on carefully drafting the material details of the underlying transaction in as clear terms as possible.This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting escrow agreements in transactions.   Defining conditions for release of property in basic, clear, explicit terms to reduce risk Drafting release instructions to tightly synchronize with the underlying transaction Inherent risks involved with escrow agent determinations Co-mingled and held in trust funds v. segregated funds Timing – how drafting too early might miss key terms in the underlying agreement Choosing the right escrow agent depending on the nature of the transaction Reducing escrow agent through E&O or other insurance   Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 5/21/23
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Drafting Indemnity Agreements in Business and Commercial Transactions

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Joel R. Buckberg, William J. Kelly, III

Indemnity agreements are central to the risk allocation and limitation of liability system built into most transactionalarrangements. The indemnitor agrees to indemnify the indemnitee on the occurrence of certain events. The scope of liability in these agreements is very carefully defined, often including actual costs but excluding consequential damages or any damages arising from third-party claims. All of the pieces of the indemnity puzzle – scope, measure of damages, exclusions and procedures for cost recovery – must be very carefully considered, negotiated and drafted. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting key provisions of indemnity agreements in transactional agreements.    Scope of indemnity – indemnity v. hold harmless, damages v. liabilities, direct v. third-party claims Types of losses subject to indemnity – breaches of reps and warranties, covenants, losses, specific circumstances Determining recoverable damages and costs, including attorneys’ fees Implied or equitable indemnity – and use of disclaimers to limit liability Difference between the duty to defend v. indemnification  Procedure for claiming and obtaining indemnification reimbursements   Speakers: Joel R. Buckberg is a shareholder in the Nashville office of Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, P.C. and chair of the firm’s commercial transactions and business consulting group. He has more than 45 years’ experience structuring and drafting commercial, corporate and business transactions.  He also counsels clients on strategic planning, financing, mergers and acquisitions, system policy and practice development, regulatory compliance and contract system drafting. Prior to joining Baker Donelson, he was executive vice president and deputy general counsel of Cendant Corporation.  Mr. Buckberg received his B.S. form Union College, his M.B.A. from Vanderbilt University, and his J.D. from Vanderbilt University School of Law. William J. Kelly, III is a founding member of Kelly Law Partners, LLC, and has more than 30 years’ experience in the areas of employment and commercial litigation.  In the area of employment law, he litigates trade secret, non-compete, infringement and discrimination claims in federal and state courts nationwide and has advised Fortune 50 companies on workplace policies and practices.  In the area of commercial litigation, his experience includes class action litigation, breach of contract and indemnity, mass-claim complex insurance litigation, construction litigation and trade secrets.  Earlier in career, he founded 15 Minutes Music, an independent music production company.  Mr. Kelly earned his B.A. from Tulane University and his J.D. from St. Louis University School of Law.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 12/21/22
    Presented
  • DETAILS
Course1

Drafting Indemnity Agreements in Business and Commercial Transactions

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Joel R. Buckberg, William J. Kelly, III

  Indemnity agreements are central to the risk allocation and limitation of liability system built into most transactionalarrangements. The indemnitor agrees to indemnify the indemnitee on the occurrence of certain events. The scope of liability in these agreements is very carefully defined, often including actual costs but excluding consequential damages or any damages arising from third-party claims. All of the pieces of the indemnity puzzle – scope, measure of damages, exclusions and procedures for cost recovery – must be very carefully considered, negotiated and drafted. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting key provisions of indemnity agreements in transactional agreements.    Scope of indemnity – indemnity v. hold harmless, damages v. liabilities, direct v. third-party claims Types of losses subject to indemnity – breaches of reps and warranties, covenants, losses, specific circumstances Determining recoverable damages and costs, including attorneys’ fees Implied or equitable indemnity – and use of disclaimers to limit liability Difference between the duty to defend v. indemnification  Procedure for claiming and obtaining indemnification reimbursements   Speakers: Joel R. Buckberg is a shareholder in the Nashville office of Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, P.C. and chair of the firm’s commercial transactions and business consulting group. He has more than 45 years’ experience structuring and drafting commercial, corporate and business transactions.  He also counsels clients on strategic planning, financing, mergers and acquisitions, system policy and practice development, regulatory compliance and contract system drafting. Prior to joining Baker Donelson, he was executive vice president and deputy general counsel of Cendant Corporation.  Mr. Buckberg received his B.S. form Union College, his M.B.A. from Vanderbilt University, and his J.D. from Vanderbilt University School of Law. William J. Kelly, III is a founding member of Kelly Law Partners, LLC, and has more than 30 years’ experience in the areas of employment and commercial litigation.  In the area of employment law, he litigates trade secret, non-compete, infringement and discrimination claims in federal and state courts nationwide and has advised Fortune 50 companies on workplace policies and practices.  In the area of commercial litigation, his experience includes class action litigation, breach of contract and indemnity, mass-claim complex insurance litigation, construction litigation and trade secrets.  Earlier in career, he founded 15 Minutes Music, an independent music production company.  Mr. Kelly earned his B.A. from Tulane University and his J.D. from St. Louis University School of Law.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 4/30/23
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Drafting Liquidated Damages Clauses

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Shannon M. Bell

Liquidated damages clauses are a risk allocation tool used across business, commercial, real estate and sometimes employment agreements.  On the occurrence of certain carefully defined triggering events, the breaching party is liable for the liquidated damages amount.  Triggering events run the gamut from failure to deliver marketable products on a timely basis to early termination of an employment contract. Though these clauses are intended reduce the risk of post-closing litigation over damages, the scope of damages is not always knowable at closing and poorly drafted clauses may cause more litigation. This program will provide you a real world guide to the essential elements of enforceable liquidated damages clauses.   Law governing liquidated damages clauses Elements of clauses – damages difficult to quantify and liquidated amount reasonably related to actual damages Guidance on optionality, specificity, self-justification, and triggers Circumstances in which clauses are most effectively used – and those where they are ineffective Practical tips of enhancing enforceability and collecting damages   Speaker: Shannon M. Bell is a member with Kelly & Walker, LLC, where has litigates a wide variety of complex business disputes, construction disputes, fiduciary claims, employment issues, and landlord/tenant issues.  Her construction experience extends from contract negotiations to defense of construction claims of owners, HOAs, contractors and tradesmen.  She also represents clients in claims of shareholder and office liability, piercing the corporate veil, and derivate actions.  She writes and speaks on commercial litigation, employment, discovery and bankruptcy topics.  Ms. Bell earned her B.S. from the University of Iowa and her J.D. from the University of Denver.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 1/15/23
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Drafting LLC Operating Agreements, Part 1

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Paul Kaplun

LLC operating agreements may be the most commonly document drafted, reviewed and negotiated by transactional counsel. These documents define the governance, information and liquidation rights of members, allocate economic rewards, sometimes establish restrictions on members or their interests, and can assign or alleviate liability.  The tax provisions, too, are highly complex, defining allocations of tax attributes and rights to cash and property distributions.  Fiduciary duties may also be modified in a way that is not possible in other types of entities. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting the most important provisions of LLC operating agreements.   Day 1: Drafting the most important provisions of LLC operating agreements Planning for different types of capital contributions – capital v. services, current contributions v. future capital calls Management provisions depending on whether the LLC is member-managed v. manger-managed LLCs Fiduciary duties of members, modifications, and the “LLC opportunity doctrine” Restrictions on transfers of capital and profits interests Relationship between tax allocation and property distribution provisions, including IRC Section 704(b) accounting   Day 2: Drafting allocation provisions for maximum tax benefit and to secure the safe harbor How “payments to member” (not distributions) are treated for financial v. tax purposes Drafting ordinary distributions, minimum tax distributions, waterfall distributions, liquidating distributions Rights of first refusal, rights of first offer, buy-sell provisions – understanding the alphabet soup of exit alternatives Liquidations of the entity and sale of an individual member’s interests   Speakers: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 12/7/23
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Drafting LLC Operating Agreements, Part 2

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Paul Kaplun

LLC operating agreements may be the most commonly document drafted, reviewed and negotiated by transactional counsel. These documents define the governance, information and liquidation rights of members, allocate economic rewards, sometimes establish restrictions on members or their interests, and can assign or alleviate liability.  The tax provisions, too, are highly complex, defining allocations of tax attributes and rights to cash and property distributions.  Fiduciary duties may also be modified in a way that is not possible in other types of entities. This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting the most important provisions of LLC operating agreements.   Day 1: Drafting the most important provisions of LLC operating agreements Planning for different types of capital contributions – capital v. services, current contributions v. future capital calls Management provisions depending on whether the LLC is member-managed v. manger-managed LLCs Fiduciary duties of members, modifications, and the “LLC opportunity doctrine” Restrictions on transfers of capital and profits interests Relationship between tax allocation and property distribution provisions, including IRC Section 704(b) accounting   Day 2: Drafting allocation provisions for maximum tax benefit and to secure the safe harbor How “payments to member” (not distributions) are treated for financial v. tax purposes Drafting ordinary distributions, minimum tax distributions, waterfall distributions, liquidating distributions Rights of first refusal, rights of first offer, buy-sell provisions – understanding the alphabet soup of exit alternatives Liquidations of the entity and sale of an individual member’s interests   Speakers: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 12/8/23
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Drafting Property Management Agreements

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  John S. Hollyfield

Commercial real estate as a recurring source of income is only as good as it is managed.  Well managed properties not only provide stable income but also hold their underlying value.  Management of commercial real estate is mostly outsourced to third parties. Management agreements vary widely according to the type of property managed – official, retail, multi-family, etc.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to the types of property management agreements, varying fee arrangements, defining the scope of a manager’s duties, rent collection and operational controls, allocating risk and liability, and much more.   Property management agreements for office and multi-family properties Defining scope of manager’s duties and responsibilities Understanding management fee alternatives Collection of rent and handling of funds Insurance, liability and indemnity issues for manager and property owner Operating decisions, controls, termination, and sale of property   Speaker: John S. Hollyfield is of counsel and a former partner in the Houston office Norton Rose Fulbright, LLP.  He has more than 40 years’ experience in real estate law practice.  He formerly served as chair of the ABA Real Property, Probate and Trust Law Section, president of the American College of Real Estate Lawyers, and chair of the Anglo-American Real Property Institute.  He has been named a "Texas Super Lawyer" in Real Estate Law by Texas Monthly magazine and is listed in Who’s Who in American Law.  He is co-editor of Modern Banking and Lending Forms (4th Edition), published by Warren, Gorham & Lamont.  He received his B.B.A. from the University of Texas and his LL.B. from the University of Texas School of Law.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 12/9/23
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Drafting Stockholder Agreements, Part 1

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Frank Ciatto, Molly Merritts

Stockholders’ agreements can make or break a closely held company.  Voting control is allocated, distribution policies established, buy-sell mechanisms defined, and the relationship of the owners organized.  Most of the big decisions of a closely held company are made in the stockholders’ agreement. In the context of S Corporations, these agreements take on even more importance in the form of various restrictions to ensure the corporation does not lose its pass-through status for federal income tax purposes. This program will provide you with a guide to planning and drafting the most essential provisions of stockholders’ agreements for C and S corporations.  Day 1: Practical uses of stockholders’ agreements Management and voting rights – what events trigger a vote and by whom Economic rights – distributions, taxes, and liquidations Information rights – access to operational, financial and tax information Day 2: Restrictions on transferability and mechanisms to buy/sell restricted stock Valuation methodologies for stock that does not have a liquid market Protective provisions for S Corps – preventing transfers to ineligible holders Provisions for approving the termination an S Corp election Close corporations and the ability to govern the company without a board of directors   Speaker: Frank Ciatto is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he has 20 years’ experience advising clients on mergers and acquisitions, limited liability companies, tax and accounting issues, and corporate finance transactions.  He is a leader of his firm’s private equity and hedge fund groups and a member of the Mergers & Acquisitions Subcommittee of the ABA Business Law Section.  He is a Certified Public Accountant and earlier in his career worked at what is now PricewaterhouseCoopers in New York.  Mr. Ciatto earned his B.A., cum laude, at Georgetown University and his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. Molly Merritts is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where she focuses her practice on a wide range of corporate law matters, including mergers and acquisitions, debt and equity financing, and real estate investment trusts. She also advises clients on corporate governance matters, transactional and commercial contract negotiations, and corporate reorganizations.  Ms. Merritt earned her B.S. from the University of Maryland, and her J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials. 

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 6/14/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Drafting Stockholder Agreements, Part 2

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Frank Ciatto, Molly Merritts

Stockholders’ agreements can make or break a closely held company.  Voting control is allocated, distribution policies established, buy-sell mechanisms defined, and the relationship of the owners organized.  Most of the big decisions of a closely held company are made in the stockholders’ agreement. In the context of S Corporations, these agreements take on even more importance in the form of various restrictions to ensure the corporation does not lose its pass-through status for federal income tax purposes. This program will provide you with a guide to planning and drafting the most essential provisions of stockholders’ agreements for C and S corporations.  Day 1: Practical uses of stockholders’ agreements Management and voting rights – what events trigger a vote and by whom Economic rights – distributions, taxes, and liquidations Information rights – access to operational, financial and tax information Day 2: Restrictions on transferability and mechanisms to buy/sell restricted stock Valuation methodologies for stock that does not have a liquid market Protective provisions for S Corps – preventing transfers to ineligible holders Provisions for approving the termination an S Corp election Close corporations and the ability to govern the company without a board of directors Speakers: Frank Ciatto is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he has 20 years’ experience advising clients on mergers and acquisitions, limited liability companies, tax and accounting issues, and corporate finance transactions.  He is a leader of his firm’s private equity and hedge fund groups and a member of the Mergers & Acquisitions Subcommittee of the ABA Business Law Section.  He is a Certified Public Accountant and earlier in his career worked at what is now PricewaterhouseCoopers in New York.  Mr. Ciatto earned his B.A., cum laude, at Georgetown University and his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. Molly Merritts is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where she focuses her practice on a wide range of corporate law matters, including mergers and acquisitions, debt and equity financing, and real estate investment trusts. She also advises clients on corporate governance matters, transactional and commercial contract negotiations, and corporate reorganizations.  Ms. Merritt earned her B.S. from the University of Maryland, and her J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials. 

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 12/15/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Drafting Supply Agreements

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Joel R. Buckberg

Supply contracts are the backbone of many businesses, providing the buying with essential goods for a production process or finished product inventory for sale.  In the supply chains these agreements create, time is of the essence.  Buyers rely on timely delivery of quality raw material or inventory.  Production and sales are often finely calibrated for just in time delivery.  In addition, there area wide range of liability issues involved in these agreements because any disruption of the supply chain can cause substantial losses.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to reviewing the most important provisions of supply agreements for clients.  Drafting and negotiating most essential terms of supply agreements Issues for both suppliers and buyers in different industries Framework of law governing supply issue, including UCC warranty and title issues Product quality, volume commitments, delivery, and more Identifying, allocating, and mitigating risk – indemnity and insurance Spotting red flags in “form” supply agreements   Speaker: Joel R. Buckberg is a shareholder in the Nashville office of Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, P.C. and chair of the firm’s commercial transactions and business consulting group. He has more than 45 years’ experience structuring and drafting commercial, corporate and business transactions.  He also counsels clients on strategic planning, financing, mergers and acquisitions, system policy and practice development, regulatory compliance and contract system drafting. Prior to joining Baker Donelson, he was executive vice president and deputy general counsel of Cendant Corporation.  Mr. Buckberg received his B.S. form Union College, his M.B.A. from Vanderbilt University, and his J.D. from Vanderbilt University School of Law.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials. 

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 7/21/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Due Diligence in Business Transactions

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  C. Ben Huber

Due diligence, often guided by lawyers, is essential to the success of major business transactions and poorly planned or conducted diligence can contribute to a buyer not getting the benefit of its bargain.  Diligence helps confirm essential assumptions about the value of a transaction and aids the discovery of unknown liabilities. There’s also a subtle relationship between the content of diligence and the time allowed to conduct it.  In more robust market environments, sellers have the upper hand and can limit diligence, making the process about time allocation and risk management. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning the diligence process, understanding the most important areas of inquiry depending on the type of transaction, and review checklists.   What to diligence, utilizing experts, and managing the process and time Impact of market environment on the length and scope of diligence Checklists – what information do you need to get, from whom, and on what timeline? Hard assets v. soft assets – how to diligence the validity and title to each Contracts with suppliers and customers – ensuring stability and visibility of revenue Financial records and statements – what should attorneys look for?   Speaker: C. Ben Huber is a partner in the Denver office of Greenburg Traurig, LLP, where he has a broad transactional practice encompassing mergers and acquisitions, restructurings and reorganizations, corporate finance, capital markets, venture funds, commercial transactions and general corporate law.  He also has substantial experience as counsel to high tech, biotech and software companies in the development, protection and licensing of intellectual property.  His clients include start-up companies, family- and other closely-held businesses, middle market business, Fortune 500 companies, venture funds and institutional investors.  Mr. Huber earned his B.A. from the University of Colorado and his J.D. at the University of Colorado Law School.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 4/2/23
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Earnouts: Taking a Wait and See Approach to Valuation of Closely Held Companies

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Frank Ciatto, Daniel G. Straga, James DePaoli

The most highly negotiated provision of most transactions is price. Sellers want to maximize the value of the deal, putting the most optimistic spin historical and forward-looking projections.  Sellers take a more skeptical view, questioning the sustainability of growth and the accuracy of forecasts.  When differences over valuation cannotbe bridged, the parties may use an earnout, which allows them to both take a wait-and-see approach and still close the transaction. Earnouts generally involve a current payment from buyer to seller together with ongoing payments to the seller if the company performs as the seller projected.  But there are many drafting and operational traps when using earnouts.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to structuring and drafting earnouts to later disputes and litigation.   Most highly negotiated and litigated provisions in earnout agreements Post-closing operations – control by buyer, but informational access to seller Defining key metrics – objective, measurable and potential traps Relationship of earnouts to senior debt and other preferential returns Debt issues and how it impacts financial results – and post-closing payments How earnouts are different than escrow and holdbacks   Speakers: Frank Ciatto is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he has 20 years’ experience advising clients on mergers and acquisitions, limited liability companies, tax and accounting issues, and corporate finance transactions.  He is a leader of his firm’s private equity and hedge fund groups and a member of the Mergers & Acquisitions Subcommittee of the ABA Business Law Section.  He is a Certified Public Accountant and earlier in his career worked at what is now PricewaterhouseCoopers in New York.  Mr. Ciatto earned his B.A., cum laude, at Georgetown University and his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. Daniel G. Straga is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he counsels companies on a wide variety of corporate and business matters across a range of industries. He advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, capital raising, venture capital, and governance matters.  Mr. Straga earned his J.D. from the George Washington University Law School and his B.A. from the University of Delaware. James DePaoli is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where his practice focuses on corporate and commercial matters. He represents clients in the acquisition and disposition of assets and securities, mergers, and other business combinations and reorganizations. Mr. Paoli earned his B.S/B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and his J.D. from Duke University School of Law.     Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials. 

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 10/18/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Equipment Leases: Drafting & UCC Article 2A Issues

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Equipment Leases: Drafting & UCC Article 2A Issues

Many companies lease rather than buy computers and servers, company cars and other capital equipment.  These leases are government by UCC Article 2A, an intricate set of provisions governing their validity, treatment, and enforcement.  If the lease is not properly drafted to comply with the UCC, it risks being re-characterized as a sale or a security interest, which give rise to substantially adverse financial and tax consequences. This program will also provide you with a practical guide to reviewing equipment leases, including spotting red flags and avoiding recharacterization.   Types of equipment leases – “true” leases, synthetic leases, “lease to own” arrangements, and more Spotting red flags of financeable leases – and how to ensure UCC 2A compliance Rights and obligations of the parties – manufacturer, lessor and lessee – and remedies for breach Circumstances leading to re-characterization of a “true lease” as a sale or financing Adverse financial, tax and practical ramifications of lease re-characterization Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials. 

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 4/21/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Ethics for Business Lawyers

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Thomas E. Spahn, William Freivogel

Lawyers advising businesses on transactions or negotiating on their behalf often confront a range of important ethical questions.  The biggest is, who is your client?  Often a company’s owners or managers will not understand the distinction between representing them and representing the company? There are also issues of identifying and clearing conflicts among clients when they are negotiating transaction.  And what can a lawyer say or do when negotiating for a client? Also, lawyers are sometimes confronted with issues about what to do when clients are dishonest.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to ethical issues when representing clients in business transactions.    Ethical issues in business and corporate practice Identifying your client in a variety of transactional contexts – the company v. its managers? Conflicts of interest in representing both sides of a transaction Ethical issues in transactional negotiations and communications with represented parties Representing clients you know to be dishonest and reporting wrong-doing “up and out”   Speakers: Thomas E. Spahn is a partner in the McLean, Virginia office of McGuireWoods, LLP, where he has a substantial practice advising clients on properly creating and preserving the attorney-client privilege and work product protections.  For more than 30 years he has lectured extensively on legal ethics and professionalism and has written “The Attorney-Client Privilege and the Work Product Doctrine: A Practitioner’s Guide,” a 750 page treatise published by the Virginia Law Foundation.  Mr. Spahn has served as a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and as a member of the Virginia State Bar's Legal Ethics Committee.  He received his B.A., magna cum laude, from Yale University and his J.D. from Yale Law School. William Freivogel is the principal of Freivogel Ethics Consulting and is an independent consultant to law firms on ethics and risk management.  He was a trial lawyer for 22 years and has practiced in the areas of legal ethics and lawyer malpractice for more than 25 years.  He is chair of the Editorial Board of the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct. He maintains the Website“Freivogel on Conflicts” at www.freivogelonconflicts.com<http://www.freivogelonconflicts.com/> .Mr. Freivogel is a graduate of the University of Illinois (Champaign), where he received his B.S. and LL.B.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 9/14/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Exit Rights in Business Agreements

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Michael Weiner

A client investment in an operating business, particularly a minority stake, is only as good as its liquidity rights. If a client cannot readily sell his or her ownership stake at fair market value, it has little real value. The key to ensuring liquidity is contractually creating a private market for the ownership stake. This market can come in the form of requiring other stakeholders, including the majority owner, to buy the minority stake at a mutually agreeable price, or creating other mechanisms for selling the stake to third parties. Without these contract rights, a stakeholder has no liquidity and is stuck. This program will provide you with a practical to planning and drafting contractual liquidity rights in closely held companies.   Planning and drafting liquidity rights in closely held companies Counseling clients about the limitations and risks of liquidity in closely held companies Framework of alternatives for determining most appropriate liquidity rights “Texas standoff” or “Russian roulette” – opportunities, risks and tradeoffs Drafting “tag-along” and “drag-along” rights – practical uses and drawbacksHow to think about valuing closely held ownership stakes   Speaker: Michael Weiner is a partner in the Denver office of Dorsey & Whitney, where he is head of the firm’s corporate department.  His practice focuses on the representation of emerging growth companies in the areas of corporate formation, mergers and acquisitions, venture capital and angel finance, public offerings, and securities regulation. He counsels boards of directors and management teams in the areas of equity compensation, corporate governance, Sarbanes-Oxley and other regulatory and disclosure matters. He also advises clients on intellectual property licensing and commercial contract matters.  Mr. Weiner earned his B.S. in economics from the University of Pennsylvania Wharton School of Business, his B.A. in American history from the University of Pennsylvania College of Arts & Sciences, and J.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.     

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 1/13/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Exit Strategies: Selling Companies to Employees, Part 1

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Paul Kaplun

Many closely held companies have only two potential sets of buyers – family members of the founding generation or managers and other employees of the enterprise. The market of third-party buyers for closely held companies can be very thin, so that when family members are not suitable buyers of a company, often the best solution is to sell to employees. But sales to employees are unlike sales to third-parties or family members, involving complex issues of how to finance the sale, transition management and control of the enterprise, retain key employees, and tax treatment. This program will provide you with a detailed discussion of the major issues of selling to employees, including valuation, how the sale price is financed, transition periods, retaining employees not in the buyout group, and tax treatment. Day 1 : Long-range planning of sales to employees – and benefits over selling to third parties or family members Negotiating with employees over sales price and valuation issues Transitions of management control, including retaining seller/founder for a period of time Practical governance issues when employees are identified as potential buyers Day 2 : Overview of alternative structures and the tradeoffs of each ESOPs – structural, practical and tax issues, including leveraged buyout options Use of company redemptions of founders to accomplish a transfer Crucial issues in drafting “earnouts” on sales to employees Seller financing options, including long-term notes and security interest in assets   Speaker: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 2/4/23
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Exit Strategies: Selling Companies to Employees, Part 2

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Paul Kaplun

Many closely held companies have only two potential sets of buyers – family members of the founding generation or managers and other employees of the enterprise. The market of third-party buyers for closely held companies can be very thin, so that when family members are not suitable buyers of a company, often the best solution is to sell to employees. But sales to employees are unlike sales to third-parties or family members, involving complex issues of how to finance the sale, transition management and control of the enterprise, retain key employees, and tax treatment. This program will provide you with a detailed discussion of the major issues of selling to employees, including valuation, how the sale price is financed, transition periods, retaining employees not in the buyout group, and tax treatment. Day 1: Long-range planning of sales to employees – and benefits over selling to third parties or family members Negotiating with employees over sales price and valuation issues Transitions of management control, including retaining seller/founder for a period of time Practical governance issues when employees are identified as potential buyers Day 2: Overview of alternative structures and the tradeoffs of each ESOPs – structural, practical and tax issues, including leveraged buyout options Use of company redemptions of founders to accomplish a transfer Crucial issues in drafting “earnouts” on sales to employees Seller financing options, including long-term notes and security interest in assets   Speaker: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 2/5/23
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Franchise Agreements: What You Need to Know Before Your Clients Signs, Part 1

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  David Gusewelle

Franchises often seem to clients like vehicles to assured success, but they are risky ventures.  The task for lawyers advising clients about franchises is to counsel them about setting reasonable expectations and help them understand the practical obligation of franchise agreements.  This is no easy task because these agreements are a complex arrangement of restrictions, fees, operational requirements, intellectual property protections and reporting periods. But understanding how these agreements work – and the range of what’s negotiable and what’s not – is essential to client success.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to the framework of franchise law, practical due diligence of franchise opportunities, and reviewing and negotiating the most important provisions of franchise agreements. Day 1: Setting and counseling clients about realistic franchise expectations Practical guide to reading/understanding a Franchise Disclosure Document (FDD) Phases of franchise review – due diligence, negotiation of agreement, and lease work Spotting red flags early in the process Framework of franchise law and relationship of federal/FTC regulations to state regulation Day 2: Major economic and non-economic provisions in franchise agreements Determining what’s truly negotiable – and what’s not Scope of territory – rights within in it and the opportunity to expand Tiers of fees, royalties and marketing expenses Operating standards and covenants – and negotiating for local modification Transfer and exit issues when a franchisee wants out   Speaker: David Gusewelle is an attorney in the Denver office of Drumm Law, LLC, where his practice focuses his practice on franchise and trademark law.  Prior to joining Drumm Law, he worked for law firms in the St. Louis, Missouri area, representing businesses and individuals in a variety of legal fields including litigation, real estate, bankruptcy and corporate law matters. Before entering private practice, he worked in real estate for an international petroleum company.  Mr. Gusewelle earned his B.S.B.A. from the University of Missouri-Columbia and his J.D. from Vanderbilt Law School.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 3/17/23
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Franchise Agreements: What You Need to Know Before Your Clients Signs, Part 2

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Live Replay: Franchise Agreements: What You Need to Know Before Your Clients Signs, Part 2

  Franchises often seem to clients like vehicles to assured success, but they are risky ventures.  The task for lawyers advising clients about franchises is to counsel them about setting reasonable expectations and help them understand the practical obligation of franchise agreements.  This is no easy task because these agreements are a complex arrangement of restrictions, fees, operational requirements, intellectual property protections and reporting periods. But understanding how these agreements work – and the range of what’s negotiable and what’s not – is essential to client success.  This program will provide you with a real world guide to the framework of franchise law, practical due diligence of franchise opportunities, and reviewing and negotiating the most important provisions of franchise agreements. Day 1: Setting and counseling clients about realistic franchise expectations Practical guide to reading/understanding a Franchise Disclosure Document (FDD) Phases of franchise review – due diligence, negotiation of agreement, and lease work Spotting red flags early in the process Framework of franchise law and relationship of federal/FTC regulations to state regulation Day 2: Major economic and non-economic provisions in franchise agreements Determining what’s truly negotiable – and what’s not Scope of territory – rights within in it and the opportunity to expand Tiers of fees, royalties and marketing expenses Operating standards and covenants – and negotiating for local modification Transfer and exit issues when a franchisee wants out   Speaker: David Gusewelle is an attorney in the Denver office of Drumm Law, LLC, where his practice focuses his practice on franchise and trademark law.  Prior to joining Drumm Law, he worked for law firms in the St. Louis, Missouri area, representing businesses and individuals in a variety of legal fields including litigation, real estate, bankruptcy and corporate law matters. Before entering private practice, he worked in real estate for an international petroleum company.  Mr. Gusewelle earned his B.S.B.A. from the University of Missouri-Columbia and his J.D. from Vanderbilt Law School.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 3/18/23
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

From One Thing to Another: Business Entity Conversions & Domestication

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Elizabeth Fialkowski Stieff

Choice of entity is not a one-time decision.  Business entities may choose to change their legal form for many reasons – changing tax laws, new investors that require a different form of entity, or market or regulatory conditions making a different form of entity the better choice. But whenever an entity is converted from one form to another, significant tax liability and corporate or partnership law issues arise.  One important consideration is how to modify the company’s underlying agreements to ensure basic economic arrangements among the owners remain intact.  This program will provide a real-world guide to entity conversions.   Conversions among C Corps, S Corps, partnerships and LLCs Strategies for minimizing tax on conversions Business and organizational law considerations when converting an entity Drafting issues in restating underlying company agreements Practical and tax traps when engaging in an entity conversion   Speaker: Elizabeth Fialkowski Stieff is an attorney in the Baltimore, Maryland office of Venable, LLP, where her practice focuses on corporate advisory matters, including mergers, acquisitions, and joint ventures, as well as tax controversies.  Prior to joining Venable, she was an associate in corporate and securities practice at a national law firm, where she advised clients on a variety of federal and state tax issues.  Before entering private practice, she served as a judicial clerk to Judge L. Paige Marvel of the United States Tax Court.  Ms. Stieff earned her B.A. from John Hopkins University and her J.D. and LL.M. from Georgetown University Law Center.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 5/14/23
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Fundamentals of Licensing Technology, Part 1

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Matt McKinney

Licenses are complex agreements governing the use of software, technology and other inventions.  Most companies depend on technology it licenses to create operate and create value.  But these complex instruments are also traps for the unwary, blending how and when the licensed technology can be used, in what territory, and by whom.  Licenses also incorporate sprawling indemnity and damages provisions. Carefully drafted, negotiated or reviewed, licenses can be the fount of great value. But their complexity is also fraught with traps.  This program will provide you with an intermediate-level guide to drafting and reviewing the most important provisions of licenses, including scope of use, property ownership and adaptation, royalties, warranties and indemnity, and remedies. Day 1: Drafting and reviewing the most important provisions of client licenses Defining the scope of the license – usage, territory, time and updates Royalties – different structures and audits Warranties in licensing – implied and express Protecting the exchange of confidential information – employee issues and trade secrets   Day 2: Remedies on breach – financial liability and specific performance Indemnity – scope of obligation, exclusions, mechanics, remedies/triggers Limitation of liability – forms liability and failure of essential purpose Risk management – insurance, escrow, force majeure IP diligence – what to look for and red flags   Speaker: Matt McKinney is a partner in the Denver office of Koenig, Oelsner, Taylor, Schoenfeld & Gaddis P.C., where his practice focuses on structuring and negotiating complex commercial and technology transactions and representing companies in intellectual property and technology-related matters.  He is experienced with a wide range of contracts regarding the commercialization and protection of intellectual property including software, content, patent and trademark licenses, and software as a service (SaaS) agreements.  Mr. McKinney earned his B.A. from Grinnell College and his J.D., with distinction, from the University of Iowa College of Law.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials. 

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 4/12/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Fundamentals of Licensing Technology, Part 2

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Matt McKinney

Licenses are complex agreements governing the use of software, technology and other inventions.  Most companies depend on technology it licenses to create operate and create value.  But these complex instruments are also traps for the unwary, blending how and when the licensed technology can be used, in what territory, and by whom.  Licenses also incorporate sprawling indemnity and damages provisions. Carefully drafted, negotiated or reviewed, licenses can be the fount of great value. But their complexity is also fraught with traps.  This program will provide you with an intermediate-level guide to drafting and reviewing the most important provisions of licenses, including scope of use, property ownership and adaptation, royalties, warranties and indemnity, and remedies. Day 1: Drafting and reviewing the most important provisions of client licenses Defining the scope of the license – usage, territory, time and updates Royalties – different structures and audits Warranties in licensing – implied and express Protecting the exchange of confidential information – employee issues and trade secrets   Day 2: Remedies on breach – financial liability and specific performance Indemnity – scope of obligation, exclusions, mechanics, remedies/triggers Limitation of liability – forms liability and failure of essential purpose Risk management – insurance, escrow, force majeure IP diligence – what to look for and red flags   Speaker: Matt McKinney is a partner in the Denver office of Koenig, Oelsner, Taylor, Schoenfeld & Gaddis P.C., where his practice focuses on structuring and negotiating complex commercial and technology transactions and representing companies in intellectual property and technology-related matters.  He is experienced with a wide range of contracts regarding the commercialization and protection of intellectual property including software, content, patent and trademark licenses, and software as a service (SaaS) agreements.  Mr. McKinney earned his B.A. from Grinnell College and his J.D., with distinction, from the University of Iowa College of Law.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials. 

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 4/13/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Getting to Market: Sales and Distribution Agreements

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Joel R. Buckberg

A product is only as successful as its distribution, only as profitable as it reaches the widest market possible.  Most suppliers of goods rely on distributors to reach the market. Distributor agreements can come in a multitude of types, including wholesale and retail distribution agreements. These agreements encompass a series of intricately interrelated provisions about the scope of products, the scope of the territory involved, exclusivity, pricing control, support in the form of marketing and training, supply guarantees, and much more.  Success for both the supplier and the distributor depends on a thoughtfully planned and drafted agreement.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to drafting the most essential provisions of distributor agreements. Understanding distributor and supplier objectives – and how they can be harmonized Legal framework of distributor agreements Products covered and how they are defined and altered over time Exclusivity – territory and products Support – training, advertising, promotion Supply guarantees, timeliness of performance Pricing – who controls and antitrust considerations   Speaker: Joel R. Buckberg is a partner in Nashville office of Baker Donelson, P.C. and vice chair of the firm’s corporate group. He has more than 40 years’ experience in corporate and business transactions.  His practice focuses on corporate and asset transactions and operations, particularly in hospitality, franchising and distribution.  He also counsels clients on strategic planning, financing, mergers and acquisitions, system policy and practice development, regulatory compliance and contract system drafting. Prior to joining Baker Donelson, he was executive vice president and deputy general counsel of Cendant Corporation.  Mr. Buckberg received his B.S. from Union College, his M.B.A. from Vanderbilt University, and his J.D. from Vanderbilt University School of Law.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 8/18/23
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Good Faith and Fair Dealing in Business Transactions: Litigation Risks

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Shannon M. Bell

When business transactions go bad – either because they fail on their own terms or they never reach the closing table – there are often recriminations, accusations of bad-faith and threats of litigation.  The parties negotiating these transactions are subject to certain standards of conduct which, if violated, give rise to liability. Various theories of liability exist, including breach of the duty of good faith and fair dealing, negligent or fraudulent misrepresentation, and interference with a business expectancy. This program will provide you with real-world guide to the standards of conduct in business transactions and your clients can mitigate risk of liability. Sources of fiduciary standards in negotiating, drafting and closing business transactions How fiduciary standards are commonly breached in transactions Role of business torts, including negligent and fraudulent misrepresentation, interference with a business expectancy Risks of litigation and practical remedies – damages, rescission, specific performance Special duties in closely held businesses, including misappropriation of company opportunities   Speaker: Shannon M. Bell is a member with Kelly Law Partners, LLC, where she litigates a wide variety of complex business disputes, construction disputes, fiduciary claims, employment issues, and landlord/tenant issues.  Her construction experience extends from contract negotiations to defense of construction claims of owners, HOAs, contractors and tradesmen.  She also represents clients in claims of shareholder and officer liability, piercing the corporate veil, and derivative actions.  She writes and speaks on commercial litigation, employment, discovery and bankruptcy topics.  Ms. Bell earned her B.S. from the University of Iowa and her J.D. from the University of Denver.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 7/31/23
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Incentive Compensation in Businesses, Part 1

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Norman Lencz

Companies of every type including incentivize compensation features in employee compensation packages. The range of incentive compensation tools and techniques available to these companies depends on the type of entity involved.  Corporate entities have stock options, restricted stock and other forms of profit or capital appreciation rights.  LLCs are even more flexible and can award a variety of forms of profit or capital rights.  These alternatives, together with voting and vesting restrictions, provide companies alternatives for virtually every circumstance.  But each alternative comes with tradeoffs – practical, tax and financial. This program will provide you with a real world guide to the incentive compensation alternatives in business entities. Day 1: Framework of incentive compensation alternatives for corporate v. pass-through entity Advantages and drawbacks of stock options, restricted stock, and profit participation rights How IRC Section 83 impacts corporate stock options, the award of restricted stock and other rights Use of vesting to impact the tax consequences of incentive compensation Special incentive compensation issues in S Corps Day 2: Use of profit interests and capital interest in LLCs, partnerships Exchanging incentive compensation for services Incentive compensation in single member LLCs Impact of IRC Section 409A and deferred compensation Employment tax considerations   Speaker: Norman Lencz is a partner in the Baltimore, Maryland office of Venable, LLP, where his practice focuses on a broad range of federal, state, local and international tax matters.  He advises clients on tax issues relating to corporations, partnerships, LLCs, joint ventures and real estate transactions.  He also has extensive experience with compensation planning in closely held businesses.  Mr. Lencz earned his B.S. from the University of Maryland and his J.D. from Columbia University School of Law.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 8/4/23
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Incentive Compensation in Businesses, Part 2

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Norman Lencz

Companies of every type including incentivize compensation features in employee compensation packages. The range of incentive compensation tools and techniques available to these companies depends on the type of entity involved.  Corporate entities have stock options, restricted stock and other forms of profit or capital appreciation rights.  LLCs are even more flexible and can award a variety of forms of profit or capital rights.  These alternatives, together with voting and vesting restrictions, provide companies alternatives for virtually every circumstance.  But each alternative comes with tradeoffs – practical, tax and financial. This program will provide you with a real world guide to the incentive compensation alternatives in business entities. Day 1: Framework of incentive compensation alternatives for corporate v. pass-through entity Advantages and drawbacks of stock options, restricted stock, and profit participation rights How IRC Section 83 impacts corporate stock options, the award of restricted stock and other rights Use of vesting to impact the tax consequences of incentive compensation Special incentive compensation issues in S Corps Day 2: Use of profit interests and capital interest in LLCs, partnerships Exchanging incentive compensation for services Incentive compensation in single member LLCs Impact of IRC Section 409A and deferred compensation Employment tax considerations   Speaker: Norman Lencz is a partner in the Baltimore, Maryland office of Venable, LLP, where his practice focuses on a broad range of federal, state, local and international tax matters.  He advises clients on tax issues relating to corporations, partnerships, LLCs, joint ventures and real estate transactions.  He also has extensive experience with compensation planning in closely held businesses.  Mr. Lencz earned his B.S. from the University of Maryland and his J.D. from Columbia University School of Law.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 8/5/23
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Letters of Intent in Business Transactions

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Stephanie Molyneaux

Letters of intent frame the material terms of business and commercial transactions.  They outline with considerable detail the substantive terms of the underlying agreement – price, reps and warranties, closing conditions, etc. They also provide a process by which a definitive underlying agreement will be finalized. But they are not, generally, intended to be definitive agreements themselves; not enforceable, only a substantial starting point. There is, however, a certain point at which the detail in these letters becomes so extensive that they become enforceable.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to the most important substantive and process aspects of letters of intent, their uses and traps, including unexpected enforceability.   Drafting effective letters of intent in transactions Purposes of letters, timing, relationship to diligence, exclusivity Substantive  terms v. process terms Indemnity, hold back and limitation of liability provisions Termination of a letter and survival of certain provisions Understanding the point at which letters of intent may become enforceable   Speaker: Stephanie Molyneaux is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where she assists clients with a wide variety of transactional matters.  Her experience includes mergers and acquisitions, corporate governance, contractual agreements, technology transactions, licensing, and intellectual property transactions.  Ms. Molyneaux received her B.A., with distinction, from American University of Beirut and her J.D., magna cum laude, from the University of Richmond School of Law.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 12/13/22
    Presented
  • DETAILS
Course1

MAC Clauses in Business Transactions

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Steven O. Weise

Material Adverse Change (MAC) clauses are common in most businesstransactions. These clauses allocate among the parties the risk of a MAC occurring between the execution of transactional documents and closing the underlying transaction.  Sellers want certainty that a sale or other transaction will close and argue that the MAC clause should be very narrowly drafted. Buyers want maximum flexibility and will argue that anything that makes the transaction unattractive should constitute a MAC.  Between those two opposing views are a host of narrow and technical but important details that need to be negotiated, details which will determine whether the transaction is successfully closed, efficiently and cost-effectively terminated, or devolves into dispute and litigation. This program will provide you with a practical guide using and drafting MAC clauses in transactions.   Drafting “Material Adverse Change” provisions and carve-outs Forms of MACs – closing conditions or representations? Practical process of “proving” a MAC occurred, including burden of proof What happens to the transaction if a MAC occurred? Spotting red flags when drafting MAC clauses and best practices to reduce the risk   Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 5/5/23
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Overview of a Business Sale Transaction

$50.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Chris Lee

Overview of a Business Sale Transaction   This course is an overview of the steps and parties involved in a typical business sale transaction. It explains what will be happening at each step in a typical business sale transaction to give the attorney an idea of what the full process outside of just the legal process looks like. The course also identifies what advisors or parties will be completing each task and how it relates to the overall transaction process. It also summarizes and recaps the high-level tasks and responsibilities that the attorney will play at various stages in the transaction process.   Speaker Bio: Mr. Lee is a co-founder and Managing Partner of Infinity Capital Partners. Mr. Lee leads projects on both the sell-side and buy-side, coordinating with clients on capital raising, debt restructuring, and business sale projects. Mr. Lee’s experience is wide-ranging, leading projects in industries such as manufacturing, distribution, transportation, healthcare, energy services, and others. In his previous role as a Partner at Giant Capital, Mr. Lee provided strategic consulting services for small and middle-market businesses, advising companies on growth equity financing, capital restructuring, and cash flow efficiencies. He has held corporate finance, product development and M&A roles with OGE Energy Corp, where he assisted in the acquisition and divestiture of several midstream oil and gas assets and served as part of the transaction team on the Enable Midstream transaction combining legacy Enogex and Centerpoint Energy’s midstream oil and gas assets. Mr. Lee holds a B.S. in Business Management from Brigham Young University, as well as an M.B.A. and a J.D. from the University of Oklahoma. Mr. Lee resides in Edmond with his wife, Megan, and their four children.    Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials. 

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 12/31/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Piercing the Entity Veil: Individual Liability for Business Acts

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Allen Sparkman

One of the bedrock principles of business law is limited liability. The individual owners of an entity – shareholders of a corporation or members of a limited liability company – cannot be held personally liable for the debts or liabilities of the entity.  But the doctrine is not absolute.  There are many common law fact patterns that allow courts to pierce the entity veil – co-mingling of funds, using an entity as an alter ego, among others – and reach an individual person’s assets. There are also several sources of statutory authority allowing veil piercing. This program will provide you with a practical guide to common law, equitable, and statutory theories of piercing entity veils.   Statutory and equitable principles to pierce the entity veil Fact pattern justifying piercing limited liability to reach an owner’s personal assets Statutory sources permitting breaching the entity veil Application of veil piercing to non-corporate entities Liability for improper distributions Piercing for withheld income and employment taxes, and sales/use taxes   Speakers: Allen Sparkman is a partner in the Houston and Denver offices of Sparkman Foote, LLP.  He has practiced law for over forty years in the areas of estate, tax, business, insurance, asset protection, and charitable giving.  He has written and lectured extensively on choice-of-entity, charitable giving and estate planning topics.  He is the Colorado reporter for the books "State Limited Partnership Laws" and "State Limited Liability Company Laws," both published by Aspen Law & Business.  He has also served as president of the Rocky Mountain Estate Planning Council.  Mr. Sparkman received his A.B. with honors from Princeton University and his J.D. with high honors from the University of Texas School of Law   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • Webcast
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 12/12/22
    Presented
  • DETAILS
Course1

Planning with Single Member LLCs, Part 1

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Paul Kaplun, Elizabeth Fialkowski Stieff

Single Member LLCs are among the most flexible vehicles in business and real estate transactions.  Creatures of state law, they are “nothing” for federal income tax purposes.  They can be used to minimize tax and liability with maximum organizational flexibility. They may be used in conjunction with S Corps and general partnerships in business and real estate transactions. But there are also substantial limits and traps.  Among the traps is that their limited liability can be pierced more easily through equitable doctrines to personal liability. There are also many potential tax traps.  This program will provide you with a real-world guide to organizing and using Single Member LLCs in transactions. Day 1: Classification of LLCs for income tax purposes – what does “nothing” mean? Formation and organizational issues – how they differ from multi-member LLCs Relationship to S Corps – as owners, as subsidiaries, as Single Member LLCs themselves Single Member LLCs as charities or as property of charities – and gifting issues Merger and acquisition issues involving Single Member LLCs Series LLCs as an alternative to commonly owned Single Member LLCs Day 2: Changes in tax classification of Single Member LLCs Single Member LLCs and general partnerships – which may own which? Piercing the veil of a Single Member LLC Compensation issues and traps Use of charging orders against Single Member LLC distributions Use of SMLCCs in real estate transactions, including Like-Kind Exchanges State tax and excise tax overview   Speakers: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. Elizabeth Fialkowski Stieff is an attorney in the Baltimore, Maryland office of Venable, LLP, where her practice focuses on corporate advisory matters, including mergers, acquisitions, and joint ventures, as well as tax controversies.  Prior to joining Venable, she was an associate in corporate and securities practice at a national law firm, where she advised clients on a variety of federal and state tax issues.  Before entering private practice, she served as a judicial clerk to Judge L. Paige Marvel of the United States Tax Court.  Ms. Stieff earned her B.A. from John Hopkins University and her J.D. and LL.M. from Georgetown University Law Center.     Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials. 

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 10/4/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Planning with Single Member LLCs, Part 2

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Paul Kaplun, Elizabeth Fialkowski Stieff

Single Member LLCs are among the most flexible vehicles in business and real estate transactions.  Creatures of state law, they are “nothing” for federal income tax purposes.  They can be used to minimize tax and liability with maximum organizational flexibility. They may be used in conjunction with S Corps and general partnerships in business and real estate transactions. But there are also substantial limits and traps.  Among the traps is that their limited liability can be pierced more easily through equitable doctrines to personal liability. There are also many potential tax traps.  This program will provide you with a real-world guide to organizing and using Single Member LLCs in transactions. Day 1: Classification of LLCs for income tax purposes – what does “nothing” mean? Formation and organizational issues – how they differ from multi-member LLCs Relationship to S Corps – as owners, as subsidiaries, as Single Member LLCs themselves Single Member LLCs as charities or as property of charities – and gifting issues Merger and acquisition issues involving Single Member LLCs Series LLCs as an alternative to commonly owned Single Member LLCs Day 2: Changes in tax classification of Single Member LLCs Single Member LLCs and general partnerships – which may own which? Piercing the veil of a Single Member LLC Compensation issues and traps Use of charging orders against Single Member LLC distributions Use of SMLCCs in real estate transactions, including Like-Kind Exchanges State tax and excise tax overview   Speakers: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. Elizabeth Fialkowski Stieff is an attorney in the Baltimore, Maryland office of Venable, LLP, where her practice focuses on corporate advisory matters, including mergers, acquisitions, and joint ventures, as well as tax controversies.  Prior to joining Venable, she was an associate in corporate and securities practice at a national law firm, where she advised clients on a variety of federal and state tax issues.  Before entering private practice, she served as a judicial clerk to Judge L. Paige Marvel of the United States Tax Court.  Ms. Stieff earned her B.A. from John Hopkins University and her J.D. and LL.M. from Georgetown University Law Center.     Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials. 

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 10/5/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Private Placements: Raising Capital from Investors, Part 1

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  S. Lee Terry

Closely held companies raise capital through private placements, an offering of stock or other securities to private investors. Offerings of every size must comply with a dense set of federal securities regulation that require the offering of securities to be registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission or qualify for an exemption from registration, mostly commonly Regulation D.  Failure to understand the regulatory framework and draft private placement documents exposes the offering company to substantial financial liability. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning private placements, drafting the operative agreements, and understanding the regulatory framework governing them. Day 1: How private placements are used as a practical matter in capital raises Understanding the securities law and regulatory framework of private placements Reliance on Reg. D safe harbor to avoid registration – amounts raised, accredited investor, timeframes, non-solicitation Understanding exempt securities v. exempt offerings Day 2: Practical guidance on drafting subscription agreements Understanding disclosures in offering documents and liability for issuer of securities Special issues for small private placements Crowdfunding as a capital raising tool   Speaker: S. Lee Terry is a partner in the Denver office of Davis, Graham & Stubbs, LLP, where he has a broad corporate and securities practice.  He advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, joint ventures, partnership agreements, licensing and other technology related contracts.  He has an active practice advising private companies, ranging from capital raising and major transactions to dispute resolution and investigations. He also has an extensive securities law practice, including various types of capital raising transactions.  Earlier in his career, he worked in the Office of General Counsel of the Securities and Exchange Commission.  Mr. Terry earned his A.B. from the University of Michigan and his J.D. from Wayne State University.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 11/3/23
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Private Placements: Raising Capital from Investors, Part 2

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  S. Lee Terry

Closely held companies raise capital through private placements, an offering of stock or other securities to private investors. Offerings of every size must comply with a dense set of federal securities regulation that require the offering of securities to be registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission or qualify for an exemption from registration, mostly commonly Regulation D.  Failure to understand the regulatory framework and draft private placement documents exposes the offering company to substantial financial liability. This program will provide you with a practical guide to planning private placements, drafting the operative agreements, and understanding the regulatory framework governing them. Day 1: How private placements are used as a practical matter in capital raises Understanding the securities law and regulatory framework of private placements Reliance on Reg. D safe harbor to avoid registration – amounts raised, accredited investor, timeframes, non-solicitation Understanding exempt securities v. exempt offerings Day 2: Practical guidance on drafting subscription agreements Understanding disclosures in offering documents and liability for issuer of securities Special issues for small private placements Crowdfunding as a capital raising tool   Speaker: S. Lee Terry is a partner in the Denver office of Davis, Graham & Stubbs, LLP, where he has a broad corporate and securities practice.  He advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, joint ventures, partnership agreements, licensing and other technology related contracts.  He has an active practice advising private companies, ranging from capital raising and major transactions to dispute resolution and investigations. He also has an extensive securities law practice, including various types of capital raising transactions.  Earlier in his career, he worked in the Office of General Counsel of the Securities and Exchange Commission.  Mr. Terry earned his A.B. from the University of Michigan and his J.D. from Wayne State University.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 11/4/23
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Reps and Warranties in Business Transactions

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  C. Ben Huber

Representations and warranties are a marquee feature of virtually every significant transaction.  Parties often conduct extensive due diligence but want specific assurances about important facts about which only the company would have the best information. These facts – e.g., the absence of liabilities or the presence of certain authorizations – can be few or great in number, and they vary according to the facts of the transaction. They are essential to most transactions. This program will provide you with a real-world guide to the differences between reps and warranties, the types and their remedies, and drafting.   Differences between reps and warranties, and their remedies Relationship between diligence and reps and warranties – and what the law says about how one impacts the other Reps and warranties concerning tangible and intangible property – title, taxes, transfer restrictions Provisions covering revenue projections, financial statements, and customer lists Understanding the limits of reps and warranties – what you can ask for, what you can get   Speaker: C. Ben Huber is a partner in the Denver office of Greenburg Traurig, LLP, where he has a broad transactional practice encompassing mergers and acquisitions, restructurings and reorganizations, corporate finance, capital markets, venture funds, commercial transactions and general corporate law.  He also has substantial experience as counsel to high tech, biotech and software companies in the development, protection and licensing of intellectual property.  His clients include start-up companies, family- and other closely-held businesses, middle market business, Fortune 500 companies, venture funds and institutional investors.  Mr. Huber earned his B.A. from the University of Colorado and his J.D. at the University of Colorado Law School.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials. 

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 9/6/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Roadmap of Venture Capital and Angel Funding, Part 1

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Howard Bobrow, Anthony Licata

Rapidly growing companies often raise capital in “angel” or venture capital transactions.  Investors provide capital in exchange for carefully structured equity rights and frequently some form of governance rights. Investors also often provide the company with industry expertise, contacts, and access that may be as valuable as financial capital. These funding transactions can take a startup or more mature company to higher levels of growth. But they are complex transactions that can involve a dozen or more interrelated documents. This program will provide you with a practical guide to the stages and documentation of an angel or venture capital transaction. Day 1: Current state of angel and venture capital markets & trends in deal terms Review of the suite of documents involved in most funding deals Methods of valuation and their impact on successive stages of investment Reviewing or drafting terms sheets – pitfalls and opportunities Angel investing – equity v. debt, common terms, impact on later venture capital funding Day 2: Review of most highly negotiated terms in funding deals Investor protections – information  & veto rights, liquidity event rights Liquidation preferences, anti-dilution rights, and dividends Striking the right balance between founders/managers and investors on the board Options pools for founders, managers and employees   Speakers: Howard Bobrow is a partner in the Cleveland, Ohio office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he chairs the firm’s venture capital practice. He counsels private equity and venture capital firms, other institutional investors and angel investors on all aspects of acquisitions, dispositions, capital formation and private placements. He regularly represents and advises funds on their organization and formation, the fundraising process, governance matters, investments and compliance with pertinent regulations.  Mr. Bobrow earned his B.S. from Miami University and his J.D. from Case Western Reserve University School of Law. Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials. 

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 7/7/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Roadmap of Venture Capital and Angel Funding, Part 2

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Howard Bobrow, Anthony Licata

Rapidly growing companies often raise capital in “angel” or venture capital transactions.  Investors provide capital in exchange for carefully structured equity rights and frequently some form of governance rights. Investors also often provide the company with industry expertise, contacts, and access that may be as valuable as financial capital. These funding transactions can take a startup or more mature company to higher levels of growth. But they are complex transactions that can involve a dozen or more interrelated documents. This program will provide you with a practical guide to the stages and documentation of an angel or venture capital transaction. Day 1: Current state of angel and venture capital markets & trends in deal terms Review of the suite of documents involved in most funding deals Methods of valuation and their impact on successive stages of investment Reviewing or drafting terms sheets – pitfalls and opportunities Angel investing – equity v. debt, common terms, impact on later venture capital funding Day 2: Review of most highly negotiated terms in funding deals Investor protections – information  & veto rights, liquidity event rights Liquidation preferences, anti-dilution rights, and dividends Striking the right balance between founders/managers and investors on the board Options pools for founders, managers and employees   Speakers: Howard Bobrow is a partner in the Cleveland, Ohio office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he chairs the firm’s venture capital practice. He counsels private equity and venture capital firms, other institutional investors and angel investors on all aspects of acquisitions, dispositions, capital formation and private placements. He regularly represents and advises funds on their organization and formation, the fundraising process, governance matters, investments and compliance with pertinent regulations.  Mr. Bobrow earned his B.S. from Miami University and his J.D. from Case Western Reserve University School of Law. Anthony Licata is a partner in the Chicago office of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, where he formerly chaired the firm’s real estate practice.  He has an extensive practice focusing on major commercial real estate transactions, including finance, development, leasing, and land use.  He formerly served as an adjunct professor at the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University and at the Illinois Institute of Technology.  Mr. Licata received his B.S., summa cum laude, from MacMurray College and his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials. 

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 7/8/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Selling to Consumers: Sales, Finance, Warranty & Collection Law, Part 1

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Steven O. Weise

There is no larger market than sales of goods to consumers.  Though the opportunities for your clients are vast, selling to consumers is unlike selling to other businesses. Sales to consumers are governed by overlapping layers of regulations covering how those sales are financed, what warranties are implied by law versus expressly made by the seller, and – when need arises – debt collection of defaulted accounts. Failure to understand and comply with these layers of complexity can lead to consumer complaints and regulatory action, litigation and substantial liability. This program will provide you a framework for understanding the law of consumer sales, including financing those sales, express and implied warranties imposed by law, and debt collection from consumers.  Day 1: Essential law governing sales to consumers – sales law, finance, warranties Sales law – how consumer sales differ from commercial sales Consumer finance – securing the sales with collateral and anticipating defaults Role of the Uniform Consumer Credit Code and Reg Z Role of the new federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Day 2: Understanding the role of implied and express warranties in consumer sales under federal law Limiting a seller’s exposure to warranties and otherwise managing risk Overview Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and the Consumer Credit Protection Act Permissible debt collection practices in consumer sales and potential liability Communications with debtors and third parties and required disclosures Best practices to avoid liability for businesses, lawyers, and law firms   Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.     Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials. 

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 9/27/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Selling to Consumers: Sales, Finance, Warranty & Collection Law, Part 2

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Steven O. Weise

There is no larger market than sales of goods to consumers.  Though the opportunities for your clients are vast, selling to consumers is unlike selling to other businesses. Sales to consumers are governed by overlapping layers of regulations covering how those sales are financed, what warranties are implied by law versus expressly made by the seller, and – when need arises – debt collection of defaulted accounts. Failure to understand and comply with these layers of complexity can lead to consumer complaints and regulatory action, litigation and substantial liability. This program will provide you a framework for understanding the law of consumer sales, including financing those sales, express and implied warranties imposed by law, and debt collection from consumers.  Day 1: Essential law governing sales to consumers – sales law, finance, warranties Sales law – how consumer sales differ from commercial sales Consumer finance – securing the sales with collateral and anticipating defaults Role of the Uniform Consumer Credit Code and Reg Z Role of the new federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Day 2: Understanding the role of implied and express warranties in consumer sales under federal law Limiting a seller’s exposure to warranties and otherwise managing risk Overview Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and the Consumer Credit Protection Act Permissible debt collection practices in consumer sales and potential liability Communications with debtors and third parties and required disclosures Best practices to avoid liability for businesses, lawyers, and law firms   Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.     Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials. 

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 9/28/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Service Level Agreements in Technology Contracting

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Peter J. Kinsella

In a world where every client depends on IT functions – web site hosting, e-commerce, telecom, storing files remotely in the Cloud, or on locally leased servers, e-mail and much more – and when most of these functions are outsourced or provided by vendors, Service Level Agreements (SLAs) are of paramount importance. SLAs set benchmarks for these services – what uptime is expected and for how long, what happens when something goes down, how is service measured and reported?  The operation of every business and every law firm rests on the answer to these questions. This program will provide you a practical guide to reviewing, drafting and negotiating SLAs for client IT functions.    Purpose of SLAs – ensuring clients get benefit of bargain, incentivizing providers Types of services – locally installed v. the Cloud Service availability – uptime, guarantees, exclusions Service performance – minimum v. expected service, resolution time v. resolution goals Special considerations when drafting for the Cloud Common failures, damages, and remedies   Speaker: Peter J. Kinsella is a partner in the Denver office of Perkins Coie, LLP, where he has an extensive technology law practice focusing on advising start-up, emerging and large companies on technology-related commercial and intellectual property transaction matters.  Prior to joining his firm, he worked for ten years in various legal capacities with Qwest Communications International, Inc. and Honeywell, Inc.  Mr. Kinsella has extensive experience structuring and negotiating data sharing agreements, complex procurement agreements, product distribution agreements, OEM agreements, marketing and advertising agreements, corporate sponsorship agreements, and various types of patent, trademark and copyright licenses.  Mr. Kinsella received his B.S. from North Dakota State University and his J.D. from the University of Minnesota Law School.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials. 

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 3/1/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Sophisticated Choice of Entity, Part 1

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Paul Kaplun, Christopher Davidson

Choosing the right entity for a closely held business is not only a choice in time but planning for long stretches of time and the likelihood of substantial change. Among those changes are changes in tax law, changes in the capital structure and ownership ranks of the company, and changes in business strategy. These and a multitude of other considerations often involve a sophisticated tradeoff of benefits and costs, balancing certainty with flexibility, in full knowledge that change is certain.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to sophisticated choice of entity considerations for closely held businesses.  Day 1: Impact of industry norms, investor expectations, and regulatory requirements Management and information rights, and the ability to restrict Fiduciary duties/liability of owners and managers, and the ability to modify these duties Economic rights – choosing among capital rights, income rights, tracking rights Day 2: Anticipating liquidity events – sale of the company, liquidation of the company, new investors/members Planning for distributions of property Owner and employee fringe benefit considerations Impact of recent tax law changes, employment taxes, and SALT considerations   Speakers: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. Christopher Davidson is a partner in the Baltimore, Maryland office of Venable, LLP, where he advises clients on a wide variety of federal and tax matters, including in the areas of corporate formations, financings, and transactions.  His focus is on foreign and domestic tax matters for partnerships, LLCs, and corporations. He is a frequent contributor to professional tax journals. Mr. Davidson received his B.A., summa cum laude, from the University of Maryland, his J.D. from the University of Maryland School of Law, and his LL.M. from New York University.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials. 

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 2/1/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Sophisticated Choice of Entity, Part 2

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Paul Kaplun, Christopher Davidson

Choosing the right entity for a closely held business is not only a choice in time but planning for long stretches of time and the likelihood of substantial change. Among those changes are changes in tax law, changes in the capital structure and ownership ranks of the company, and changes in business strategy. These and a multitude of other considerations often involve a sophisticated tradeoff of benefits and costs, balancing certainty with flexibility, in full knowledge that change is certain.  This program will provide you with a practical guide to sophisticated choice of entity considerations for closely held businesses.  Day 1: Impact of industry norms, investor expectations, and regulatory requirements Management and information rights, and the ability to restrict Fiduciary duties/liability of owners and managers, and the ability to modify these duties Economic rights – choosing among capital rights, income rights, tracking rights Day 2: Anticipating liquidity events – sale of the company, liquidation of the company, new investors/members Planning for distributions of property Owner and employee fringe benefit considerations Impact of recent tax law changes, employment taxes, and SALT considerations   Speakers: Paul Kaplun is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP where he has an extensive corporate and business planning practice, and provides advisory services to emerging growth companies and entrepreneurs in a variety of industries. He formerly served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught business planning.  Before entering private practice, he was a Certified Public Accountant with a national accounting firm, specializing in corporate and individual income tax planning and compliance.  Mr. Kaplun received his B.S.B.A., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University and J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. Christopher Davidson is a partner in the Baltimore, Maryland office of Venable, LLP, where he advises clients on a wide variety of federal and tax matters, including in the areas of corporate formations, financings, and transactions.  His focus is on foreign and domestic tax matters for partnerships, LLCs, and corporations. He is a frequent contributor to professional tax journals. Mr. Davidson received his B.A., summa cum laude, from the University of Maryland, his J.D. from the University of Maryland School of Law, and his LL.M. from New York University.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials. 

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 2/2/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Structuring Minority Ownership Stakes in Companies

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Frank Ciatto, Molly Merritts

Taking a minority ownership stake in a closely held company is a common occurrence. An investor may have taken a minority stake to fund growth in the business or someone may have provided essential, non-cash services – technical expertise, sales skill, management expertise – in exchange for equity. But there are substantial drawbacks with minority stakes. The minority stake holder may have limited access to information to the business and little or no control or influence over the ultimate success of the business.  The majority stake holder(s) may also seek to force out minority stake holders. This program will provide you with a real-world guide to structuring minority stake investments in anticipation of the majority stake owner eventually forcing the buyout of minority stake owners. Structuring minority stake ownership for eventual buyout by the majority stake owner How to avoid undue dispute and litigation through planning Framework of law protecting minority stake owners Equitable structuring of minority stake governance, information, and other rights Differences between passive minority-stake owner and those who actively participate in the business Valuation and buyout finance issues for majority stake owners Liquidity rights for minority stake owners Counseling techniques to help avoid open dispute among owners Speaker: Frank Ciatto is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where he has 20 years’ experience advising clients on mergers and acquisitions, limited liability companies, tax and accounting issues, and corporate finance transactions.  He is a leader of his firm’s private equity and hedge fund groups and a member of the Mergers & Acquisitions Subcommittee of the ABA Business Law Section.  He is a Certified Public Accountant and earlier in his career worked at what is now PricewaterhouseCoopers in New York.  Mr. Ciatto earned his B.A., cum laude, at Georgetown University and his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. Molly Merritts is an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Venable, LLP, where she focuses her practice on a wide range of corporate law matters, including mergers and acquisitions, debt and equity financing, and real estate investment trusts. She also advises clients on corporate governance matters, transactional and commercial contract negotiations, and corporate reorganizations.  Ms. Merritt earned her B.S. from the University of Maryland, and her J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 11/20/23
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

Techniques to Avoid and Resolve Deadlocks in Closely Held Companies

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  S. Lee Terry

One of the biggest risks to a closely held company is a dispute among the members of its ownership group. The members may disagree about a major company transaction, the strategic direction of the company, distribution practices, or simply develop ruinous inter-personal issues.  In closely held companies that are held by a single family, disputes are particularly personal, often arising when members of a junior generation succeed to the interests and leadership role of the senior generation.  Unless these disputes are carefully channeled into dispute resolution mechanisms, the stability and financial success of the company is threatened.  This program will provide you with a guide to the sources of disputes in closely held companies and mechanisms for resolution, with an emphasis using buy/sell agreements to resolve disputes. Common sources of disputes and deadlocks in closely-held companies Planning and drafting mechanisms to resolve disputes Conflicts over strategic transactions, distributions, or inter-personal relations Practical use of buy/sell agreements to liquidate interest of dissenting member Major elements of buy/sell agreements Alternatives to using buy/sell agreements   Speaker: S. Lee Terry is a partner in the Denver office of Davis, Graham & Stubbs, LLP, where he has a broad corporate and securities practice.  He advises clients on mergers and acquisitions, joint ventures, partnership agreements, licensing and other technology related contracts.  He has an active practice advising private companies, ranging from capital raising and major transactions to dispute resolution and investigations. He also has an extensive securities law practice, including various types of capital raising transactions.  Earlier in his career, he worked in the Office of General Counsel of the Securities and Exchange Commission.  Mr. Terry earned his A.B. from the University of Michigan and his J.D. from Wayne State University.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 8/13/23
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

The Law of Consignments: How Selling Goods for Others Works

$85.00
  • Author/Instructor:  Steven O. Weise

In a consignment, the consignor, ships or transfers control of goods to a seller, the consignee, who agrees to market the property to buyers and pay over some portion of the sales proceeds to the consignor. The arrangement involves an intricate set of rights and obligations among the parties. There are also substantial and often overlooked risks, including that the consignee’s creditors may seek to claim a security interest in the consigned property.  If these risks are not properly understood and remedies not carefully considered, the consignor is at risk of loss. This program will provide you to the law of consignments, UCC Article 9 issues and risks, and provide practical tips for drafting consignment agreements.   Structure of common consignment transactions Parties, rights and obligations – consignor as creditor, consignee as debtor, creditors Risks of loss to consignor and how it can protect itself against consignee’s creditors Consignor remedies for consignee breach Law of consignments and relationship to secured finance Circumstances when UCC Article 9 does not apply to consignments   Speaker: Steven O. Weise is a partner in the Los Angeles office Proskauer Rose, LLP, where his practice encompasses all areas of commercial law. He has extensive experience in financings, particularly those secured by personal property.  He also handles matters involving real property anti-deficiency laws, workouts, guarantees, sales of goods, letters of credit, commercial paper and checks, and investment securities.  Mr. Weise formerly served as chair of the ABA Business Law Section. He has also served as a member of the Permanent Editorial Board of the UCC and as an Advisor to the UCC Code Article 9 Drafting Committee.  Mr. Weise received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law.   Disclaimer:  All views or opinions expressed by any presenter during the course of this CLE is that of the presenter alone and not an opinion of the Oklahoma Bar Association, the employers, or affiliates of the presenters unless specifically stated. Additionally, any materials, including the legal research, are the product of the individual contributor, not the Oklahoma Bar Association. The Oklahoma Bar Association makes no warranty, express or implied, relating to the accuracy or content of these materials. 

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 3/22/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS